Cupcake Board And Cable Installation

This page is part of the CupCake CNC build sequence.

Attach the motherboard and stepper drivers

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Bolt the motherboard and the stepper drivers to the side of the Cupcake CNC as shown, using M3x16 bolts. Use the plastic spacers to put some space between the wood and the electronics.















STOP! Check that the 110V/220V switch on your power supply is set correctly.

Hook up the power

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Connect the four-pin molex connectors from your ATX power supply to each of the stepper boards. Connect the 20-pin connector to the motherboard. All the sockets are keyed, so it should be clear which way around each connector goes.

UPDATE: The ATX power supply in the Deluxe kit might have a connector that looks like it has too many conductors. Don't worry, the extra 4 pins are in a *separate* connector that actually slides down off of the main 20-pin connector!

Wire up the stepper boards

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Use the ribbon cables with the IDC sockets to connect the stepper driver boards to the labeled X, Y, and Z connections on the motherboard.

Although there may be labels on the side of the Cupcake CNC indicating X, Y, and Z, you can hook up the stepper drivers up in any way you choose, as long as each stepper (next step) is hooked up to the board wired to the corresponding socket on the motherboard. In our example, we've decided to use the bottommost stepper driver as the Y driver, rather than the X driver, because the wires running to the Y axis stepper are just long enough to reach that bottommost board at their full extension.

Note: Sometimes the ribbon cables do not come pre-assembled but as a cable and two snap-on endplugs. Each endplug has a small triangle engraving on it that points to one wire in the ribbon cable. Make sure that both endplugs' triangles point to the same color wire or you will have to make a new ribbon cable (the endplugs never come off after you snapped them on).

NOTE: In addition to paying attention to keeping the same color wire on the triangle, also pay attention to whether or not the IDC connector is flipped upside down or not. If you get it the wrong way and are picky about your wiring, you could be very upset when the wire is coming out of the wrong side of the PCB.

Attach the steppers

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Attach the stepper connectors to the corresponding driver boards for each of the X, Y, and Z axis. One side of each connector should have a couple of small triangular ramps on it; these should meet the corresponding protrusions on the board when the connector is the right way around.

Connect the extruder

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Plug one end of a patch cable into any of the RJ45 jacks on the motherboard, run it through the holes in the corner of the machine as shown, and plug the far end into the extruder.

Note: Do yourself a favor and use a shielded Cat5e patch cable to keep down on EMI from the stepper motors.

That's it! The core electronics of your Cupcake CNC are hooked up. Step back and revel in your MakerBot assembly skills!

Revel in MakerBot glory

Document!

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Now is a great time to upload a picture of your MakerBot Cupcake CNC to the MakerBot Flickr Group at [http://flickr.com/groups/makerbot] Here's the first production model that we made! (Number 21)

You should also head over to thingiverse and click the "I made one" button on the MakerBot Cupcake CNC page! [http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:457]

Next steps

Once you're done smiling and staring at your fully assembled but yet motionless machine, you'll surely want to get it moving.
Don't shoot out - do this first:

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